Re-imagining the role of the NAPWHA Treatment Outreach Network

Re-imagining the role of the NAPWHA Treatment Outreach Network

Re-imagining the role of the NAPWHA Treatment Outreach Network


NAPWHA’s Treatment Officer Network (TON) has operated for over twenty years. During that time the treatments landscape has changed fundamentally, as treatments have become simpler and easier to take, resulting in less demand from clients for treatment advice and support. Organisations have refocused on broader health and wellbeing issues including wellness, quality of life, mental health, housing, employment, and education, among others. In this environment NAPWHA sought to explore alternative arrangements for provision of HIV treatments information to and by its member organisations.

In 2021, NAPWHA surveyed community organisations to collect data on: client needs and how these are met; numbers of staff and the type of staff engaged in HIV treatments education; views on how treatments information might be delivered in future; and workforce development and service standards to support this vision. A consultant analysed the findings and presented options for future treatments engagement.

This initiative is the first survey of treatments information provision in the past decade. It represents an opportunity for HIV community organisations and HIV care providers to consider and respond to the changing context and experiences of HIV care an peer support. This poster was presented at the Joint HIV&AIDS & Sexual Health Conference 2022.  See also the abstract submitted

NAPWHA agency engagement with PLHIV

NAPWHA agency engagement with PLHIV

NAPWHA is Australia’s peak non-government organisation representing community-based groups of people living with HIV (PLHIV). This raises some questions. Does the organisation actually represent HIV-positive communities? If so, which ones? And how well? This poster presented at AIDS2022 Conference (The 24th International AIDS Conference). See also: Assessing NAPWHA’s Engagement with PLHIV Report [PDF}

#Peers Explain: Quantifying unmet HIV treatment needs research on TikTok

#Peers Explain: Quantifying unmet HIV treatment needs research on TikTok

#Peers Explain:  Quantifying unmet HIV treatment needs / Peers explain research on TikTok

This poster presented at AIDS2022 Conference (The 24th International AIDS Conference) is the culminated of the work of the National Association of People Living with HIV Australia (NAPWHA) and ViiV Healthcare Australia. Did you know your relationship with your doctor can have a direct impact on your health? This explainer was made by HIV Peers.

The Australian Community Accord on Quality of Life for PLHIV

The Australian Community Accord on Quality of Life for PLHIV

The Australian Community Accord on Quality of Life for People Living with HIV A person-centred framework for eliciting and addressing the drivers of self-perceived quality of life.

This poster presented at AIDS2022 Conference (The 24th International AIDS Conference) is the culminated of the work of the National Association of People Living with HIV Australia (NAPWHA) undertaking a series of web-based community engagement events to build an understanding of how people with HIV in Australia define good quality of life. The end result is an Australian Community Accord on Quality of Life for People with HIV, which is both a commitment and a call-to-action for the partners in the Australian HIV response. The Accord defines a framework, based on thematic analysis of our extensive consultation findings, for identifying and addressing the drivers of self-perceived quality of life in people with HIV. It complements validated standardised measures such as PozQOL and the WHOQOL-HIV scales.

U=U Media Guidelines: A resource for journalists reporting on HIV

U=U Media Guidelines: A resource for journalists reporting on HIV

Journalists and those working in the media are uniquely placed to communicate about HIV in a way that encourages understanding, promotes factual information and reduces the stigma associated with HIV. One way journalists can do this is by talking about U=U. These U=U Media Guidelines: A resource for journalists reporting on HIV were produced by ASHM and NAPWHA.